Once Upon A Bit

Today’s case-study is pretty short – you are going to get its intention in a matter of seconds.
We are going to talk about observation, and about the slight difference between a no-bug to a major security issue.

Every security research requires respectful amounts of attention and distinction. That’s why there are no successful industrial automatic security testers (excluding XSS testers) – because machines cannot determine all kinds of security risks. As a matter of fact, machines cannot feel danger or detect it. There is no one way for a security research to be conducted against a certain targets. The research parameters are different and varies from the target. Some researches end after a few years, some researches end after a few days and some researches end after a few minutes. This case-study is of the last type. The described bug was so powerful and efficient (to the attacker), that no further research was needed in order to get to the goal.

A very famous company, which, among all the outstanding things it does, provides security consulting to a few dozens of industrial companies and  start-ups, asked us to test its’ “database” resistance. Our goal was to leak the names of the clients from a certain type of collection – not SQL-driven one (we still haven’t got the company’s approval to publish it’s name or the type of vulnerable data collection).

So, after a few minutes of examining the queries which provide information from the data collection, I understood that the name of the data row is a must in order to do a certain action about it. If the query-issuer (=the user who asks the information about the row) has permissions to see the results of the query – a 200 OK response is being returned. If he doesn’t – again – a 200 OK response is being returned.

At first I thought that this is a correct behavior. Whether the information exists in the data collection or not – the same response is being returned.
BUT THEN, Completely by mistake, I opened the response to the non existent data row in the notepad.

The end of the 200 OK response contained an unfamiliar, UTF-8 char – one that shouldn’t be there. The length of the response from the non existent data row request was longer in 1 bit!

At first, I was confused. Why does the response to a non-existent resource contains a weird character at the end of it?
I was sure that there is a JS code which checks the response, and concludes according to that weird char – but there wasn’t.

This was one of the cases where I cannot fully explain the cause of the vulnerability, because of a simple reason – I don’t see the code behind.

The company’s response, besides total shock to the our fast response, was that “apparently, when a non-existent resource is being requested from the server, a certain sub-process which searches for this resource in the data collection fires-up and encounters a memory leak. The result of the process, by rule, should be an empty string, but when the memory leak happens, the result is a strange character. The same one which is being added to the end of the response.

Conclusion
Making your code run a sub-process, a thread or, god forbid, an external 3rd-party process is a very bad practice.
I know that sometimes this is more convenient and it can save a lot of time, but whenever you are using another process – you cannot fully predict its results. Remember – it can crush, freeze, force-closed by the OS or by some other process (anti-virus?).
If you must use a thread or sub-process, at least do it responsibly – make sure the OS memory isn’t full, the arguments that you pass to the process, the process’s permission to run and its possible result scenarios. Don’t ever allow the process to run or execute critical commands basing on user input information.

Knocking the IDOR

Are you following FogMarks?

Hello to you all.

Sorry for the no-new-posts-November, FogMarks has been very busy experiencing new fields and worlds. But now – we’re on baby!

Today’s case-study is on an old case (and by old I mean 3 months old), but due to recent developments in an active research of a very known company’s very known product, I would like to present and explain the huge importance of an Anti-IDOR mechanism. Don’t afraid, we’re not biting.

Introduction

Basically, an IDOR (Insecure Direct Object Reference) allows attacker to mess around with an object that does not belong to him. This could be the private credentials of users, like the email address, private object that the attacker should not have access to, like a private event, or public information that should simply, and rationally – not be changed by a 3rd person, like a title of a user (don’t worry – case-study about the Mozilla vulnerability is on its way).

When an attacker is able to mess around with an object that does not belongs to him, the consequences might be devastating. I am not talking just about critical information disclosure that could lead the business to the ground, I am talking about messing around with objects that could lead the attacker to execute code on the server. Don’t be so shocked – it is very much possible.

From IDOR to RCE

I’m not going to disclosed the name of the company or software that this serious vulnerability was found on. I am not even going to say that this is a huge company with a QA and security response team that could fill an entire mall.
But I am going to tell you how an IDOR became an RCE on the server, without violent graphic content of course. For Christ’s sake, children might be reading these lines!

Ideally speaking,
An IDOR is being prevented using an Anti-IDOR Mechanism (AIM). Us at FogMarks have developed one a few years ago, and, know-on-wood, none of our customers ever dealt with an IDOR problem. Don’t worry, we’re not going to offer you to buy it. This mechanism was created only for two large customers who shared the same code base. Create your own mechanism with the info below, jeez!
But seriously, AIM’s main goal is to AIM the usage of a certain object only to the user who created it, or have access to it.

This is being done by holding a database table especially for sensitive objects that could be targeted from the web clients.
When an object is being inserted to the table, the mechanism generates to it a special 32 chars long identifier. This identifier is only being used by the server, and it is calld SUID (Server Used ID). In addition, the mechanism issues a 15 chars long integer identifier for the client side that is called, of course, CUID (Client Used ID). The CUID integer is being made from part of the 32 chars long SUID and part of the object permanent details (like name-if name cannot be changed afterwards) using a special algorithm.

In the users’ permissions table there is also a row of list of nodes that contains the SUID of objects that the user has access to it.

When the user issues a request from the client side (from the JS – a simple HTTP request (POST/GET/OPTIONS/DELETE/PUT…), the CUID is being matched with the SUID – the algorithm tries to generate the SUID from the supplied CUID. If it succeed, it then tries to match the generated SUID the SUIDs list in the users’ permission table. If it match, the requesting user gets one time, limited access to the object. This one time access is being enabled for x minutes and for one static IP, until the next process of matching CUID to SUID.

All this process, of course, is being managed by only one mechanism – The AIM. AIM handles request in a queue form, so when dealing with multiple hundreds of requests – AIM might not be the perfect solution (due to possible object changes by 2 different users).

In conclusion, in order to keep your platform cure from IDORs, requests to access sensitive objects should be managed only by one mechanism. You don’t have to do the exact logic like we did and to compile two different identifiers to the same object, but if you’ll like to prevent IDORs from the first moment (simply spoofing the ID), our proposed solution is for the best.

Here are some more examples of IDORs found by FogMarks in some very popular companies (and were patched, of course):

Private Element Gone Public

Are you following FogMarks?

In what way you interact with “private” elements of your users? I mean elements like their name, email address, home address, phone number or any other kind of information that may be important to them.

Today’s case-study talks just about that. We will talk about the way private elements (and I’ll explain the term ‘elements’ later) should be handled, and then we will see 2 neat examples from vulnerabilities I have found on Facebook (and were fixed, of course).

OK, so you are mature enough to ask your users to trust you with their email address, home address and phone number. If you are smart, you’ll know that this type of information should be transmitted on the wire via HTTPS, but you’ll remember that sometimes it is a good practice to encrypt by yourself.

But now that the users info are properly saved, and your system is immune to SQL injections, I would like to introduce you to your next enemy: IDOR.

Insecure Direct Object References are your info’s second-worst enemy (after SQLi, of course). Attacker who is able to access other users private elements (such as email address, phone number, etc) basically could expose all of the private data from the server.

This is the time to explain my definition to private elements. User elements are not just the user’s phone number, email address, name, gender, sexual-orientation or favorite side of the bed. They are also elements that the user’s creates or own, like the items in the user’s cart, a group that the user owns or a paint that a user makes.

The best way to handle private elements is to define them as private and treat them with the needed honor.

If you know that only a certain user (or users) should be able to access a certain element, make sure that only those users IDs (or other identifier) are able to access and fetch the element.

How will you do so? Using a private elements manager of course.
The idea is simple: A one class that is fetching information about private events only if an accepted identifier is being provided (for example, a class that will return the email address of the user ID ‘212’ only if the ID of the user who requested that information is ‘212’.

By sticking to this logic you’ll enforce a strong policy that will make all of the APIs to interact the same way with the private elements.

Now, our good friends at Facebook apparently forgot to change their logic on their old mbasic site (mbasic.facebook.com).

I have found 2 vulnerabilities which allowed the name of a private (secret) group or event to be disclosed to any user, regardless the fact that he is not invited or in the group/event. The first vulnerability is here by presented, but the second one is yet to be fully patched (it is in progress these days):

Should We Blame The Diet Coke Smuggler?


Everyone use user-controlled parameters. This is, as far as I concerned, the easiest way to create an effective http negotiation process. It means that in order to ease the interaction process between the site and the user, the site allows the user to tell him about essentials parameters that are needed for the next interaction. Even while this post is being written, after I’ll click ‘Publish’ a lot of POST parameters will be sent to the server and will be processed.

As you might have already guessed, today’s case-study will highlight the huge disadvantage of allowing users to ‘tell you what to do’.

Basically, I don’t believe in POST or GET. I know its sound funny or stupid, but when I see that so many security breaches were launched using a GET or a POST requests, I cannot live with that comfortably. I know that GET and POST are ‘just the messenger’ and it will be like blaming an innocent person who was used to smuggle diet Coke into a movie theater.

But I think that we all forgot one important thing – GET and POST are not alone. HTTP, especially on its latest version (and the next version) supports other request types. Like what? PUT, DELETE, OPTIONS. Those requests were made for a reason, and almost none of the latest players on the dev market are using them. Why? Because its not easy, and its not ‘widely used’. That idiotic term I heard a few days ago on a developer conference I participated. People kept explaining that a certain technology should not be used because “it is not widely used, and therefore there is not enough support or security research and maintenance”. And again – why exactly shouldn’t I use a unique software that no one else does? Why should I count on our security community to alert me whenever a software I’m using is breached?

As for HTTP requests, GET and POST are what I call ‘deprecated’. Too much companies and too much software use GET and POST requests with dozens of parameters to ‘get things done’. This is exactly the reason why XSSes vulnerabilities, along with IDORs and CSRFs, are being successfully executed – Websites use too much parameters and the developers, at some point, aren’t able to track the software’s behavior under certain conditions – from a general use by a client to an aggressive security research by professionals. That’s just the way it is. Another reason for security breaches is that websites count that the user will return them the parameters they expect, and if the user returns only a few parameters, some server side actions that are being executed by the missing parameters are not being executed, resulting in a security vulnerability.

Now, should we cry and bury GET and POST? No, of course that there is a way to keep using GET and POST and still be safe. All you have to do is to not blame the diet Coke smuggler, and to follow these 5 rules:

  1. Minimize the number of parameters that are being used. More parameters = more security breaches possibilities.
  2. Know exactly the purpose of each parameter.
  3. Know exactly what type of data each parameter should hold.
  4. Know what happens when each parameter is given the wrong type of data, or is MIA.
  5. And the most important thing – use all of the parameters! I can’t count the number of times a security breach was successfully launched because of a lack of using all the parameters. In fact, I’m writing these days another case-study about a Facebook security vulnerability just about that.

As for a finish, I’ll just drop this tiny note: FogMarks is looking nowdays for some new challenges. If you think you can interest us with something, simply DM us on Twitter (and make sure your’e following us) or send us an email on contact@fogmarks.com.

How Private Is Your Private Email Address?


After reading some blog posts about Mozilla’s Addons websites, I was fascinated from this python-based platform and decided to focus on it.
The XSS vector led basically to nowhere. The folks at Mozilla did excellent job curing and properly sanitizing every user input.

This led me to change my direction and search for the most fun vulnerabilities – logic flaws.

The logic flaws logic
Most people don’t know, but the fastest way to track logic issues is to see things logically. That’s it. Look at a JS function – would you write the same code? What would you have changed? Why?

Mozilla’s Addons site has a collections feature, where users can create a custom collection of their favorite addons. That’s pretty cool, since users can invite other users to a role on their collection. How, do you ask? By email address of course!

A user types in the email address of another user, an ajax request is being made to an ‘address resolver’ and the ID of the user who owns this email address returns.

When the user press ‘Save Changes’, the just-arrived ID is being passed to the server and the being translated again to the email address, next to the user’s username. Pretty wierd.

So, If the logic, for some reason, is to translate an email to an ID and then the ID to the email, we can simply interrupt this process in the middle of it, and replace the generated ID with the ID of another user.

The following video presents a proof of concept of this vulnerability, that exposed the email address of any of addons.mozilla.org users.

Final Thoughts
It is a bad practice to do the same operation twice. If you need something to be fetched from the server, fetch it one time and store it locally (HTML5 localStorage, cookie, etc.). This simple logic flaw jeopardized hundreds of thousands of users until it was patched by Mozilla.

The patch, as you guessed, was to send the email address to the server, instead of sending the ID.

Facebook Invitees Email Addresss Disclosure

Prologue

When Facebook was just a tiny company with only a few members, it needed a way to get more members.

Today, when you want more visitors to your site, you advertise on Facebook, because everybody is there.

Back than, the main advertising options were manually post advertisements on popular websites (using Google, for instance), or getting your members invite their friends using their email account.

Facebook’s Past Invitation System

When a user joined Facebook at its early days, there was literally nothing to see. Therefore, Facebook asked their members to invite their friends using an email invitation that was created by the registered user.

The user supplied his friends email addresses, and they received an email from Facebook saying that ‘Mister X is now on Facebook, you should join too!’.

Fun Part

As I came across this feature of Facebook I immediately started to analyze it.

I thought it would be nice to try and fool people that a user Y invited them to join, although the one who did it was the user X.

As I kept inviting people over and over again I have noticed something interesting: each invitation to a specific email address contained an invitation ID: ent_cp_id.

When clicking on Invite to Facebook a small windows pops up and shows the full email address of the invitee.

I wrote down the ent_cp_id of some email I would like to invite, and invited him once.

At this point I thought: “OK, I have invited this user, the ent_cp_id of him should not be accessible anymore”. But I was wrong. The ent_cp_id of it was still there. In fact, by simply re transmitting the HTTP request I could invite the same user again.

But the most interesting part of this vulnerability is the fact that any user could have seen the email address that was behind an ent_cp_id.

That means that anyone who was ever invited to Facebook via email was vulnerable to email address disclosure, because that invitation was never deleted and it was accessible to any user. All an attacker had to do next was to randomly guess ent_cp_ids. As I said, old ent_cp_ids aren’t deleted, so the success rate is very high.

Conclusion

When you are dealing with sensitive information like email address you should always limit the number of times that an action could be done. In addition, it is recommended to wipe any id that might be linked to that sensitive information, or at least hash-protect it.

Facebook quickly solved this issue and awarded a kind bounty.